What are my chances of getting into med sales?

I just graduated with a degree in biology, and my whole time at college I was going for something in healthcare as a practitioner whether med, dent, etc...

I've recently been rethinking if I want to go into that and what I can do with my current degree.

This world of med/even dental devices sales is new to me but seems very interesting and a good stepping board for maybe going on to an MBA.

I graduated with a 3.76 and clearly show I have the intellect to understand the products and the science behind them, which I feel many people in med sales don't have.

But I don't have any sales experience, and only one job at a sporting good call center for 2 years in high school(i didn't work in college)

I do have some volunteer, club and shadowing experiences with which I can try to sell my communication skills, leadership skills, and knowledge into the field. But I just wonder can I get in without any real work or sales experience?

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Selling copiers does seem like a weird background for a medical device or pharma company to hire from but there are a lot of reasons why it is smart.

The sales training that most copier companies use is top notch. They focus on managing a territory, spin selling, role plays, etc. The thought from many medical sales companies is they can hire reps who have been really well trained in sales but don't come in thinking they know how to sell in the operating room or to physicians. It's pretty smart because then those reps become trained the right way and don't have bad habits that they brought from other medical sales companies. For example, the sales training/operating room you get at a distributor probably isn't close to what you would get during Boston Scientific's training. There may be good programs but most don't come close to the training from a big company. A company that hires this way is able to focus more on the company's product training and less on the sales aspect because they know those reps have a good baseline in selling skills.

I think copier sales is a good move for 2 years if you can suck it up for that long.

The problem with those jobs is that unless you get a direct sales job with a Xerox or Ricoh you end up working for one of their distributors and make very little money. Then the question is do you work for a ortho distributor and probably make a little more money or stick with a copier distributor if you can't get a direct sales job with one of them?

Is the sales training at an Orthopedic distributor good?

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Why copier sales?

Selling copiers does seem like a weird background for a medical device or pharma company to hire from but there are a lot of reasons why it is smart.

The sales training that most copier companies use is top notch. They focus on managing a territory, spin selling, role plays, etc. The thought from many medical sales companies is they can hire reps who have been really well trained in sales but don't come in thinking they know how to sell in the operating room or to physicians. It's pretty smart because then those reps become trained the right way and don't have bad habits that they brought from other medical sales companies. For example, the sales training/operating room you get at a distributor probably isn't close to what you would get during Boston Scientific's training. There may be good programs but most don't come close to the training from a big company. A company that hires this way is able to focus more on the company's product training and less on the sales aspect because they know those reps have a good baseline in selling skills.

I think copier sales is a good move for 2 years if you can suck it up for that long.

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Device companies love this backgr

Why copier sales?

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Agree, go sell copiers for a couple of years and then interview for any medical sales job you want.

Device companies love this backgr

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Move fast, Xerox is laying off 10,000 people and their sales reps will be blowing up recruiters phones before too long.

Every Xerox rep has been calling recruiters for 6 months.

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I have been in med device sales for over 15 years with top S&P 500 companies. My colleagues and I started a consulting service to help individuals like yourself get into our industry.

Our services provide everything from resume creation to interview coaching and job offer negotiations. We can provide the actual sales rep interview questions used by hiring managers at the most prestigious organizations and assist in preparing answers that can move you forward in the interview process. Our team consists of individuals with experience from J&J, Stryker, Cooper Surgical, Applied Medical, Boston Scientific, Bard and Covidien.

We strenuously discourage anyone from spending thousands of dollars on “medical device sales training programs/colleges”. These schools are viewed poorly in our industry. The information is too generic and not a substitute for experience. A company that hires you will put you through their own training program.

Our rates are very reasonable and are customizable to your specific needs. Email me at IPSCT1000@gmail.com if you have an interest in learning more.

Join the rep network for a lower class of jobs. BG

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I have been in med device sales for over 15 years with top S&P 500 companies. My colleagues and I started a consulting service to help individuals like yourself get into our industry.

Our services provide everything from resume creation to interview coaching and job offer negotiations. We can provide the actual sales rep interview questions used by hiring managers at the most prestigious organizations and assist in preparing answers that can move you forward in the interview process. Our team consists of individuals with experience from J&J, Stryker, Cooper Surgical, Applied Medical, Boston Scientific, Bard and Covidien.

We strenuously discourage anyone from spending thousands of dollars on “medical device sales training programs/colleges”. These schools are viewed poorly in our industry. The information is too generic and not a substitute for experience. A company that hires you will put you through their own training program.

Our rates are very reasonable and are customizable to your specific needs. Email me at IPSCT1000@gmail.com if you have an interest in learning more.

Zero. Your question already states your low level of selling

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To answer your question, yes, you will be able to get a job in med sales if you want. Based on my experience, having a biology background will be helpful for certain jobs.

What have you done so far in trying to get interviews and have you found certain jobs/companies/specialties that are of interest to you?

I have been in med device sales for over 15 years with top S&P 500 companies. My colleagues and I started a consulting service to help individuals like yourself get into our industry.

Our services provide everything from resume creation to interview coaching and job offer negotiations. We can provide the actual sales rep interview questions used by hiring managers at the most prestigious organizations and assist in preparing answers that can move you forward in the interview process. Our team consists of individuals with experience from J&J, Stryker, Cooper Surgical, Applied Medical, Boston Scientific, Bard and Covidien.

We strenuously discourage anyone from spending thousands of dollars on "medical device sales training programs/colleges". These schools are viewed poorly in our industry. The information is too generic and not a substitute for experience. A company that hires you will put you through their own training program.

Our rates are very reasonable and are customizable to your specific needs. Email me at IPSCT1000@gmail.com if you have an interest in learning more.

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it is all about networking and who you know. Yes a Biogy degree may help. Start networking in your area with anyone you know in the medical field, Doctors , surgeons , RN , surgical tech, managers , purchasing , recruiters .

Go and get some sales experience at a B2B company , read books and podcasts about sales . There is usually a rep for almost everything in a hospital , Gloves , surgical drapes, suture , cardiac implants , plates and screws, pacemakers , scopes

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Agree, go sell copiers for a couple of years and then interview for any medical sales job you want.

Move fast, Xerox is laying off 10,000 people and their sales reps will be blowing up recruiters phones before too long.

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It is hard to answer this question without knowing what you are interested in. Do you think you are more interested in selling a surgical product or in a pharmaceutical drug?

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There are reps for every specialty. Device jobs will likely pay more because they are higher pressure than a pharma job.

You could find a job as an associate rep at an orthopedic distributor or even a job at JNJ as an entry level rep. If you can't get a job with JNJ or you find the ortho reps to be a little uneducated, you can always get a B2B job and stay there for 2-3 years while you get great sales training. There are so many medical sales companies that like hiring reps who worked at Xerox, Paychex, Gallo, etc.

Agree, go sell copiers for a couple of years and then interview for any medical sales job you want.

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Many of the pacer (pacemaker) companies could be an option down the road. They tend to love biology or pre-med majors for those positions. I don't think they would hire someone without medical device experience for one of their associate reps. There are the pacemaker rep schools which get good reviews if you want to start there. I don't remember the names of the schools but they are out there. Maybe get some sales experience and then go to one of those schools after a couple of years. As a biology major I think you would like those jobs.

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Many of the pacer (pacemaker) companies could be an option down the road. They tend to love biology or pre-med majors for those positions. I don't think they would hire someone without medical device experience for one of their associate reps. There are the pacemaker rep schools which get good reviews if you want to start there. I don't remember the names of the schools but they are out there. Maybe get some sales experience and then go to one of those schools after a couple of years. As a biology major I think you would like those jobs.

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Like I said I am extremely early in the game so I am still figuring it all out, currently looking into different companies and ways to get in like internships and such.

How broad is the specialty range in med sales? Are there reps for every field, like derm, primary care, oncology, surgery, ortho, etc....?

There are reps for every specialty. Device jobs will likely pay more because they are higher pressure than a pharma job.

You could find a job as an associate rep at an orthopedic distributor or even a job at JNJ as an entry level rep. If you can't get a job with JNJ or you find the ortho reps to be a little uneducated, you can always get a B2B job and stay there for 2-3 years while you get great sales training. There are so many medical sales companies that like hiring reps who worked at Xerox, Paychex, Gallo, etc.

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